Question and answer
When an electron is displaced in a semiconductor, the hole that's left behind is A. incapable of carrying a charge. B. considered an impurity in the crystal. C. attracted to the negative terminal of the voltage source. D. attracted to the anode of the voltage source.
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Asked 10/16/2018 11:32:40 AM
Updated 6/5/2020 11:47:49 AM
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User: When an electron is displaced in a semiconductor, the hole that's left behind is A. incapable of carrying a charge. B. considered an impurity in the crystal. C. attracted to the negative terminal of the voltage source. D. attracted to the anode of the voltage source.

Weegy: When an electron is displaced in a semiconductor, the hole that's left behind is attracted to the negative terminal of the voltage source.
Expert answered|Score .9814|falloutgirl19|Points 701|

User: Which of the following does not serve as a way to neutralize the charge in a body? A. Bringing the charged body into contact with another body having an equal but opposite charge B. Adding more protons to a positively charged body until the number of protons matches the number of electrons C. Allowing free electrons to escape from a negatively charged body D. Adding free electrons to a positively charged body

Question
Asked 10/16/2018 11:32:40 AM
Updated 6/5/2020 11:47:49 AM
1 Answer/Comment
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8
Adding more protons to a positively charged body until the number of protons matches the number of electrons does not serve as a way to neutralize the charge on a body.
Added 6/5/2020 11:47:49 AM
This answer has been confirmed as correct and helpful.
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If we're interested in knowing the rate at which light energy is received by a unit of area on a particular surface, we're really trying to figure out the A. luminous intensity. B. illuminance of a surface. C. luminous flux. D. incandescence.
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Updated 7/16/2020 3:24:04 AM
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If we're interested in knowing the rate at which light energy is received by a unit of area on a particular surface, we're really trying to figure out the illuminance of a surface.
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When white light is incident on a prism, which one of the resulting color components will have the lowest index of refraction? A. Orange B. Green C. Yellow D. Blue
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Updated 3/25/2020 12:19:30 AM
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When white light is incident on a prism, orange color components will have the lowest index of refraction.
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Unlike images produced by a convex spherical mirror, images produced by concave spherical mirrors A. are always going to be virtual. B. can be real or virtual depending on the object's placement. C. are always going to be displayed upright, not inverted. D. are located only by the mirror.
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Updated 3/25/2020 12:20:35 AM
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Unlike images produced by a convex spherical mirror, images produced by concave spherical mirrors can be real or virtual depending on the object's placement.
Added 3/25/2020 12:20:35 AM
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If you notice that two waves combine and a part of the resulting wave has less light intensity than either of the individual waves, you're observing A. diffraction. B. destructive interference. C. constructive interference. D. polarization.
Question
Updated 11/28/2019 12:56:04 AM
1 Answer/Comment
If you notice that two waves combine and a part of the resulting wave has less light intensity than either of the individual waves, you're observing destructive interference.
Added 11/28/2019 12:56:04 AM
This answer has been confirmed as correct and helpful.
If you notice that two waves combine and a part of the resulting wave has less light intensity than either of the individual waves, you're observing A. diffraction. B. destructive interference. C. constructive interference. D. polarization.
Question
Updated 6/11/2020 11:45:14 PM
1 Answer/Comment
If you notice that two waves combine and a part of the resulting wave has less light intensity than either of the individual waves, you're observing destructive interference.
Added 6/11/2020 11:45:14 PM
This answer has been confirmed as correct and helpful.
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