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In what ways can nationalism be negative?
1. Bigotry and intolerance. Human nature being what it is tends to corrupt concepts that should be positive. Isolationism, racism and ethnic confict. 2. Facism. 3. Simplistic thinking and population control through propaganda. 4. [ Expolitation of the people by their leaders. 5. The creation of falso enemies. ]
Expert answered|AmandaBeers2012|Points 10|
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Asked 1/12/2012 8:38:44 AM
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Discuss the powerful movements that transformed European society during the early modern era
Weegy: Modern history From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Modern era) "Modern" and "Modern Age" redirect here. [ For other uses, see Modern (disambiguation) and Modern Age (disambiguation). Human history This box: view talk edit ? Prehistory Recorded History Ancient history Earliest records Near East Africa Classical antiquity East Asia South Asia Early Americas Middle Ages Early Middle Ages High Middle Ages Late Middle Ages Modern history Early modern Late modern Contemporary ?Future Modern history, or the modern era, describes the historical timeline after the Middle Ages.[1][2] Modern history can be further broken down into the early modern period and the late modern period after the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. Contemporary history describes the span of historic events that are immediately relevant to the present time. The modern era began approximately in the 16th century.[3][4] Many major events caused Europe to change around the turn of the 16th century, starting with the Fall of Constantinople in 1453, the fall of Muslim Spain and the discovery of the Americas in 1492, and Martin Luther's Protestant Reformation in 1517. In England the modern period is often dated to the start of the Tudor period with the victory of Henry VII over Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485.[5][6] Early modern European history is usually seen to span from the turn of the 15th century, through the Age of Reason and the Age of Enlightenment in the 17th and 18th centuries, until the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in the late 18th century. ] (More)
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Asked 1/5/2012 1:30:08 AM
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Describe the experience of the Middle Passage.
Weegy: The Middle Passage was the stage of the triangular trade in which millions of people from Africa[1] were shipped to the New World, as part of the Atlantic slave trade. [ Ships departed Europe for African markets with manufactured goods, which were traded for purchased or kidnapped Africans, who were transported across the Atlantic as slaves; the slaves were then sold or traded for raw materials,[2] which would be transported back to Europe to complete the voyage. Voyages on the Middle Passage were a large financial undertaking, and they were generally organized by companies or groups of investors rather than individuals.[3] Traders from the Americas and Caribbean received the enslaved Africans. European powers such as Portugal, England, Spain, France, the Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, and Brandenburg, as well as traders from Brazil and North America, took part in this trade. The enslaved Africans came mostly from eight regions: Senegambia, Upper Guinea, Windward Coast, Gold Coast, Bight of Benin, Bight of Biafra, West Central Africa and Southeastern Africa.[4] An estimated 15% of the Africans died at sea, with mortality rates considerably higher in Africa itself in the process of capturing and transporting indigenous peoples to the ships.[5] The total number of African deaths directly attributable to the Middle Passage voyage is estimated at up to two million; a broader look at African deaths directly attributable to the institution of slavery from 1500 to 1900 suggests up to four million African deaths.[6] For two hundred years, 1440–1640, Portuguese slavers had a near monopoly on the export of slaves from Africa. During the eighteenth century, when the slave trade transported about 6 million Africans, British slavers carried almost 2.5 million.[7] ] (More)
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Asked 1/5/2012 11:12:52 PM
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why was the Africans were considered cargo,
Weegy: I HOPE THIS WILL HELP YOU... (More)
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Asked 1/6/2012 2:48:56 AM
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1. What economic system took hold in Europe and greatly affected society? Communism Capitalism Socialism Collectivism
Weegy: Capitalism took hold in Europe and greatly affected society. (More)
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Asked 1/9/2012 1:11:28 PM
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1. What economic system took hold in Europe and greatly affected society? Communism Capitalism Socialism Collectivism
Weegy: What economic system took hold in Europe and greatly affected society? Capitalism (More)
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Asked 1/9/2012 1:13:00 PM
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