You have new items in your feed. Click to view.
Question and answer
In describing the Cook, Chaucer says, But very ill it was, it seemed to me, / That on his shin a deadly sore had he (lines 387 388). Is this a direct or indirect characterization? Is it both? What
do these lines from The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales tell you about the Cook?
But very ill it was, it seemed to me, / That on his shin a deadly sore had he. These lines from the Canterbury Tales, describing the Cook, represent both direct and indirect characterisation. Direct because we learn something specific about the Cook, indirect in that the "sore" is a metaphor for the Cook's dirty, unhygienic habits, which Chaucer is uneasy about. Even in Chaucer's day it was
recognised that cooks ought to keep a clean kitchen, and that running sores were unhealthy.
Get an answer
Original conversation
User: In describing the Cook, Chaucer says, But very ill it was, it seemed to me, / That on his shin a deadly sore had he (lines 387 388). Is this a direct or indirect characterization? Is it both? What do these lines from The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales tell you about the Cook?

Weegy: But very ill it was, it seemed to me, / That on his shin a deadly sore had he. These lines from the Canterbury Tales, describing the Cook, represent both direct and indirect characterisation. Direct because we learn something specific about the Cook, indirect in that the "sore" is a metaphor for the Cook's dirty, unhygienic habits, which Chaucer is uneasy about. Even in Chaucer's day it was recognised that cooks ought to keep a clean kitchen, and that running sores were unhealthy.




User: Consider the many characterizations in “The Prologue” to The Canterbury Tales of the men and women associated with the church. From these portraits, what conclusion might you draw about Chaucer’s attitude toward the church and/or religious practitioners? Write an essay in which you present your conclusion and support it with evidence from “The Prologue.”

Weegy: Chaucer has a fairly cynical attitude toward the church and religious practitioners, viewing most of them as corrupt and as given to self-serving and so-called "sinful" behavior as the people for whom they supposedly set an example. [ To illustrate this, students might point to his characterizations of the Nun, the Monk, the Friar, the Summoner, and/or the Pardoner—and, in particular, what these characters say about how they spend their time and what they're willing to overlook or pardon in exchange for gifts. ]
Expert answered|zess|Points 20|

Question
Asked 10/14/2013 7:24:27 AM
0 Answers/Comments
New answers
Rating

There are no new answers.

Comments

There are no comments.

Add an answer or comment
Log in or sign up first.
25,771,141 questions answered
Popular Conversations
Solve the inequality 9(x - 3) < 4(x + 10).
7/22/2016 11:35:55 AM| 2 Answers
On financial websites you can find
Weegy: plss specify your question...thank you User: On financial websites you can find Weegy: plss specify your ...
7/22/2016 12:46:36 PM| 2 Answers
Plants cannot grow without ...
7/23/2016 12:28:58 AM| 2 Answers
Roger Sperry s right brain/left brain concept
7/22/2016 2:33:38 AM| 1 Answers
Weegy Stuff
S
P
L
Points 496 [Total 1246] Ratings 1 Comments 486 Invitations 0 Offline
S
P
Points 188 [Total 447] Ratings 1 Comments 178 Invitations 0 Offline
S
Points 184 [Total 605] Ratings 1 Comments 174 Invitations 0 Offline
S
L
P
P
P
Points 150 [Total 2898] Ratings 0 Comments 150 Invitations 0 Offline
S
Points 88 [Total 227] Ratings 0 Comments 88 Invitations 0 Offline
S
L
P
P
P
Points 55 [Total 3759] Ratings 0 Comments 55 Invitations 0 Offline
S
Points 11 [Total 61] Ratings 1 Comments 1 Invitations 0 Offline
S
1
L
L
P
R
P
L
P
P
R
Points 8 [Total 12606] Ratings 0 Comments 8 Invitations 0 Offline
S
L
Points 3 [Total 1766] Ratings 0 Comments 3 Invitations 0 Offline
S
Points 2 [Total 2] Ratings 0 Comments 2 Invitations 0 Offline
* Excludes moderators and previous
winners (Include)
Home | Contact | Blog | About | Terms | Privacy | © Purple Inc.