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where did buddhism originate from and how did it spread
Buddhism started in India with a prince named Siddhartha. Once, he glimpsed suffering on the street. He saw a poor, old, hungry man. This had convinced him to give up his position as prince and search for the truth; that is, a way to end suffering. [ Of course, his mother and father disapproved. His mother had a dream of a white elephant, meaning that he would someday wander, but they didn't
want him to. Eventually, he did have his way and he left his mother, father, and family (yeah, I know. Very irresponsible) so that he could find it. He went many ways, but finally arrived at his truth by meditating under a bo tree. It motivated him to make up the Four Noble Truths, which prettu much outline how to end suffering. The Four Noble Truths are: All life is suffering, the reason for suffering is desire, the only way to end suffering is to end desire, and the only way to end desire is to follow the Eightfold Path. The Eightfold Path pretty much says things like right thought, right speech, right behavior, etc. Buddhism started in India, and was quite successful there. It started around the 500s B.C., and was adopted by Asoka the philosopher king in the 200s B.C. during his rule of the Maurya empire. Unfortunately, Buddhism had declined in India for a number of reasons. The first was the rise of the Gupta Empire. This empire had promoted cultural flowering, but had also promotedHimdu texts such as the Upanishads, and eventually, their promotion of Himduism had led to the decline of Himduism. Also, it didn't quite sit well with the public. Women didn't favor it because Hinduism had more clearly given them a role in the home, whereas Buddhism for women at the time did not give them a clearly defined role anywhere. Buddhism had ended with the Mughal empire, started by King Aurangzeb, an Arab who had a low tolerance for other religions as a Muslim. So, Buddhism was prettu much stamped out in India. Though there are, now, a few Buddhists in India, not many of them are there. Later on, in the 200s A.D. and onward, it had spread to China. There's a Chinese woodblock print copy of the Diamond Sutra written in 868 A.D. in China, so it stayed there for a long while. ]
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What evidence exists to indicate that unity was achieved during the war against Persia between Athens and Sparta? Did their bond last?
Weegy: The Athenians accepted Spartan leadership, even after Athens was destroyed. [ Their armies fought effectively together against Xerxes eventually driving the Persians out of Greece. The Spartans were prepared to fight Persia in the Greek mainland despite knowing it would be easier to simply defend the Isthmus of Corinth. ] (More)
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Weegy: The Greco-Persian Wars (also often called the Persian Wars) were a series of conflicts between the Achaemenid Empire of Persia and city-states of the Hellenic world that started in 499 BC and lasted until 449 BC. [ The collision between the fractious political world of the Greeks and the enormous empire of the Persians began when Cyrus the Great conquered Ionia in 547 BC. Struggling to rule the independent-minded cities of Ionia, the Persians appointed tyrants to rule each of them. This would prove to be the source of much trouble for the Greeks and Persians alike. In 499 BC, the then tyrant of Miletus, Aristagoras, embarked on an expedition to conquer the island of Naxos, with Persian support;[2] however, the expedition was a debacle and, pre-empting his dismissal, Aristagoras incited all of Hellenic Asia Minor into rebellion against the Persians. This was the beginning of the Ionian Revolt, which would last until 493 BC, progressively drawing more regions of Asia Minor into the conflict. Aristagoras secured military support from Athens and Eretria, and in 498 BC these forces helped to capture and burn the Persian regional capital of Sardis. The Persian king Darius the Great vowed to have revenge on Athens and Eretria for this act. The revolt continued, with the two sides effectively stalemated throughout 497–495 BC. In 494 BC, the Persians regrouped, and attacked the epicentre of the revolt in Miletus. At the Battle of Lade, the Ionians suffered a decisive defeat, and the rebellion collapsed, with the final members being stamped out the following year. ] (More)
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Weegy: explain the causes and effects of the Peloponnese war: Answer: The Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC) was an Ancient Greek military conflict, fought by Athens and its empire against the Peloponnesian League, led by Sparta. [ Historians have traditionally divided the war into three phases. In the first, the Archidamian War, Sparta launched repeated invasions of Attica, while Athens took advantage of its naval supremacy to raid the coast of the Peloponnese attempting to suppress signs of unrest in its empire. This period of the war was concluded in 421 BC, with the signing of the Peace of Nicias. That treaty, however, was soon undermined by renewed fighting in the Peloponnesus. In 415 BC, Athens dispatched a massive expeditionary force to attack Syracuse in Sicily; the attack failed disastrously, with the destruction of the entire force, in 413 BC. This ushered in the final phase of the war, generally referred to either as the Decelean War, or the Ionian War. In this phase, Sparta, now receiving support from Persia, supported rebellions in Athens' subject states in the Aegean Sea and Ionia, undermining Athens' empire, and, eventually, depriving the city of naval supremacy. The destruction of Athens' fleet at Aegospotami effectively ended the war, and Athens surrendered in the following year. The Peloponnesian War reshaped the Ancient Greek world. On the level of international relations, Athens, the strongest city-state in Greece prior to the war's beginning, was reduced to a state of near-complete subjection, while Sparta was established as the leading power of Greece. The economic costs of the war were felt all across Greece; poverty became widespread in the Peloponnese, while Athens found itself completely devastated, and never regained its pre-war prosperity. ] (More)
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