Question and answer
What are the tradeoffs to consider in selecting disability insurance?
When looking for a disability insurance policy, there are many things to consider. [ Since many disability policies offset or deduct social security disability benefits, there may be even more factors to consider when choosing a disability insurance policy. With so many different policy options, it can be hard to tell what is necessary and what isn’t. To aid in the process, we’ve narrowed it
down to the top 10 things to consider when choosing a disability insurance policy: Whether to purchase an individual policy or purchase a policy at work. If you are thinking of purchasing disability insurance, you may have the option of obtaining disability coverage through your employer’s group benefits plan. However, most of these plans limit your enforcement of coverage, should you ever become disabled, under federal ERISA law. ERISA affords great protection to the insurance company and almost none to you, the insured. The only advantage to these policies is that they are cheap or possibly even free, since your employer pays for most if not all of the premium. A better option, if you can afford it, is to purchase your own individual policy. Under this option, you have the advantage of enforcing your policy, should you ever need to use it, under more advantageous state bad faith law and deceptive trade practices acts. Also, make sure you have both short term and long term disability benefits. If you purchase disability coverage on your own, your premiums will be based on a number of factors including age, health and occupation. Individually purchased polices are more expensive but you get what you pay for. The specifics of your coverage can vary greatly depending on whether you purchase through your employer or not, so it is best to check both options to ensure you are getting the best coverage for your circumstances. ]
Expert answered|tjdcet|Points 11|
Question
Asked 6/6/2012 11:07:00 PM
0 Answers/Comments
Get an answer
New answers
Rating

There are no new answers.

Comments

There are no comments.

Add an answer or comment
Log in or sign up first.
Questions asked by the same visitor
A corporation is liable for the torts and crimes that are committed by its agents and employees when they are acting within the scope of their employment. Directors, officers, and employees are personally liable for the torts and crimes that they commit within the scope of their employment. Can and should these principles be applied to the disaster at the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil drilling platform in April 2010? If so, how?
Weegy: First under US Corporate laws, [ a corporation is formed partly for the purpose of limiting liability and maximizing its ability to profit its shareholders within the tax structure of the state in which it does business so long as the corporation complies with state and federal laws. When a corporation commits a tort, which is a provable harm done to a person or entity; it should have procured before hand, sufficient insurance coverage to cover that potential liability. However, if it commits a crime, no insurance under the sun will cover criminal activities. For purposes of this discuss, we can assume that the incidence that took place off the Gulf of Mexico was not committed by a crime syndicate, as BP and Transocean are NOT related to any Mafia syndicate, furthermore, the incidence that happened was not attributable to an intentional act. It was, at most, caused by "Negligence". Be it BP or Transocean (TO) or jointly, the Plaintiff (a person, any legal entity suing for recovery of damages) in a lawsuit must prove that either BP, TO or they jointly, had failed to conduct its exploration in accordance with the safety rules and procedures mandated by US Oil drilling standards. In order to ensure a favorable outcome, if the Plaintiff could FURTHER prove that BP and TO's drilling activity leading up to the date of the incidence was not in compliance with "industry standards". This is the key point Plaintiff must prove. Sometimes, governmental rules and regulations concerning drilling safety may not be as stringent as "Industry Standards” in the off-shore drilling industry. When an activity is "inherently dangerous" (there is no other safer alternative to lessen the dangerous aspect of this commercial activity) as evident in off-shore oil drilling, then, under most laws in US, it is judged by the “Strict Liability in Tort" standard. ] (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 6/6/2012 9:51:22 AM
0 Answers/Comments
A corporation is liable for the torts and crimes that are committed by its agents and employees when they are acting within the scope of their employment. Directors, officers, and employees are personally liable for the torts and crimes that they commit within the scope of their employment. Can and should these principles be applied to the disaster at the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil drilling platform in April 2010? If so, how?
Weegy: First under US Corporate laws, [ a corporation is formed partly for the purpose of limiting liability and maximizing its ability to profit its shareholders within the tax structure of the state in which it does business so long as the corporation complies with state and federal laws. When a corporation commits a tort, which is a provable harm done to a person or entity; it should have procured before hand, sufficient insurance coverage to cover that potential liability. However, if it commits a crime, no insurance under the sun will cover criminal activities. For purposes of this discuss, we can assume that the incidence that took place off the Gulf of Mexico was not committed by a crime syndicate, as BP and Transocean are NOT related to any Mafia syndicate, furthermore, the incidence that happened was not attributable to an intentional act. It was, at most, caused by "Negligence". Be it BP or Transocean (TO) or jointly, the Plaintiff (a person, any legal entity suing for recovery of damages) in a lawsuit must prove that either BP, TO or they jointly, had failed to conduct its exploration in accordance with the safety rules and procedures mandated by US Oil drilling standards. In order to ensure a favorable outcome, if the Plaintiff could FURTHER prove that BP and TO's drilling activity leading up to the date of the incidence was not in compliance with "industry standards". This is the key point Plaintiff must prove. Sometimes, governmental rules and regulations concerning drilling safety may not be as stringent as "Industry Standards” in the off-shore drilling industry. When an activity is "inherently dangerous" (there is no other safer alternative to lessen the dangerous aspect of this commercial activity) as evident in off-shore oil drilling, then, under most laws in US, it is judged by the “Strict Liability in Tort" standard. ] (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 6/6/2012 10:00:27 AM
0 Answers/Comments
21,929,426 questions answered
Popular Conversations
What is a culture region? A. a geographic unit determined by ...
Weegy: C. a large, contained region, like a continent User: A thematic map that shows languages or religions ...
8/27/2015 12:51:36 PM| 3 Answers
Complete the analogy below. Fingers are to hands as _______ to ...
Weegy: Fingers are to hands as TOES to feet. User: Hammer is to nail as screwdriver is to ...
8/27/2015 8:58:25 AM| 2 Answers
What was the main agreement made with the establishment of the North ...
Weegy: C. that each nation would come to one another's defense in the event of a Soviet attack User: Who ...
8/27/2015 1:02:18 PM| 2 Answers
blank endorsement?
8/27/2015 3:47:01 PM| 2 Answers
Write the equation for 5x 2y = 3 in slope-intercept form.
Weegy: The equation for 5x + 2y = 3 in slope-intercept form is y = -5/2x + 3/2. User: 5x+2y=3 solve for x User: y= ...
8/27/2015 9:25:42 PM| 2 Answers
What is the value of the expression ( 3)^4? A. 12 B. 12 C. ...
Weegy: What is the value of the expression ( 3)4? The answer is 3^(-4)=1/3^4=1/81.
8/27/2015 9:49:36 PM| 2 Answers
Weegy Stuff
S
P
C
L
P
L
1
P
P
1
P
1
P
L
P
R
Points 1138 [Total 11491]| Ratings 6| Comments 1078| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
Points 730 [Total 1045]| Ratings 1| Comments 720| Invitations 0|Offline
S
1
L
L
Points 677 [Total 9145]| Ratings 2| Comments 647| Invitations 1|Offline
S
L
L
P
1
Points 667 [Total 9240]| Ratings 2| Comments 647| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 479 [Total 705]| Ratings 1| Comments 469| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 242 [Total 250]| Ratings 0| Comments 242| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 215 [Total 215]| Ratings 3| Comments 185| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 214 [Total 533]| Ratings 1| Comments 204| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 145 [Total 222]| Ratings 0| Comments 145| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 104 [Total 105]| Ratings 1| Comments 94| Invitations 0|Offline
Home | Contact | Blog | About | Terms | Privacy | Social | ©2015 Purple Inc.