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Finish "translating" the prologue to Romeo and Juliet from Shakespeare's poetry to your prose. Use the dictionary as necessary. Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay
our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life; Whose misadventur'd piteous overthrows Do with their death bury their parents' strife. The fearful passage ...
a. Romeo and Juliet Of Course
Expert answered|rabsun|Points 10|
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Asked 6/10/2012 10:35:52 PM
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