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The United States' decision to deny Filipino independence How was this conflict perceived in the United States?
Weegy: The Philippine–American War, [ also known as the Philippine War of Independence or the Digmaang Pilipino-Amerikano (1899–1902),[12] was an armed conflict between the United States and Filipino revolutionaries. The conflict arose from the struggle of the First Philippine Republic to gain independence following annexation by the United States.[13][14] The war was part of a series of conflicts in the Philippine struggle for independence, preceded by the Philippine Revolution and the Spanish–American War. Fighting erupted between U.S. and Filipino revolutionary forces on February 4, 1899, and quickly escalated into the 1899 Battle of Manila. On June 2, 1899, the First Philippine Republic officially declared war against the United States.[15] The war officially ended on July 4, 1902.[16] However, some groups led by veterans of the Katipunan continued to battle the American forces. Among those leaders was General Macario Sacay, a veteran Katipunan member who assumed the presidency of the proclaimed Tagalog Republic, formed in 1902 after the capture of President Aguinaldo. Other groups, including the Moro people and Pulahanes, continued hostilities until their defeat at the Battle of Bud Bagsak on June 15, 1913.[1][2] Opposition in the United States to the war inspired the founding of the Anti-Imperialist League on June 15, 1898. The war and occupation by the U.S. would change the cultural landscape of the islands, as the people dealt with an estimated 34,000–1,000,000 casualties, disestablishment of the Catholic Church in the Philippines as the state religion (since the U.S. allowed freedom of religion), and the introduction of the English language as the primary language of government, education, and business. In 1916, the U.S. promised some self-government, a limited form of which came in 1935. In 1946, following World War II, the United States gave the territory independence through the Treaty of Manila. Contents ] (More)
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