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Q: when to use inductive teaching?
A: The answer is Throughout the years I have used inductive teaching methods to teach students concepts and generalizations. I present students with data, ask them to make observations of that data, and on the basis of those observations, [ I ask students to state the concept or generalization that I'm teaching. I have found this to be an effective teaching method because it encourages
participation, which helps any activity to be more interesting. As you know, the more interesting an activity is, the easier it is to get students focused and involved in the lesson. The inductive teaching method is also effective for developing perceptual and observational skills. Students not only learn content but they learn how to process data and how to use it to arrive at appropriate conclusions. This teaching method involves three general initiatives: planning the activity, executing the activity, and evaluating the outcome. Planning the Activity First, I determine the concept or generalization to be taught. For the purpose of this brief demonstration, I will select the generalization, "The end punctuation mark is placed inside the quotation mark in direct quotations." With the point of the lesson firmly in mind, I select examples that support this generalization. I prepare a list of sentences that illustrates correctly punctuated sentences in direct quotations. I open Microsoft Word on my laptop and turn on the digital projector that's connected to it. I'm ready to begin the lesson. Executing the Activity I begin by typing my first example sentence: "Stop!" Shannon's father yelled as the girl ran toward the street. I say to the class, "Tell me what you notice about this sentence." The first student says, "It's written in English." "You're absolutely right!" I respond enthusiastically, as I type his response for all to see. "What else do you notice about this sentence?" Someone else says, "It has eleven words in it." "Does it? Let's see," I respond. I look at the screen and count the words out loud. ]
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User: when to use inductive method?

User: when to use inductive teaching?





Weegy: The answer is Throughout the years I have used inductive teaching methods to teach students concepts and generalizations. I present students with data, ask them to make observations of that data, and on the basis of those observations, [ I ask students to state the concept or generalization that I'm teaching. I have found this to be an effective teaching method because it encourages participation, which helps any activity to be more interesting. As you know, the more interesting an activity is, the easier it is to get students focused and involved in the lesson. The inductive teaching method is also effective for developing perceptual and observational skills. Students not only learn content but they learn how to process data and how to use it to arrive at appropriate conclusions. This teaching method involves three general initiatives: planning the activity, executing the activity, and evaluating the outcome. Planning the Activity First, I determine the concept or generalization to be taught. For the purpose of this brief demonstration, I will select the generalization, "The end punctuation mark is placed inside the quotation mark in direct quotations." With the point of the lesson firmly in mind, I select examples that support this generalization. I prepare a list of sentences that illustrates correctly punctuated sentences in direct quotations. I open Microsoft Word on my laptop and turn on the digital projector that's connected to it. I'm ready to begin the lesson. Executing the Activity I begin by typing my first example sentence: "Stop!" Shannon's father yelled as the girl ran toward the street. I say to the class, "Tell me what you notice about this sentence." The first student says, "It's written in English." "You're absolutely right!" I respond enthusiastically, as I type his response for all to see. "What else do you notice about this sentence?" Someone else says, "It has eleven words in it." "Does it? Let's see," I respond. I look at the screen and count the words out loud. ]
Expert answered|daryljoy|Points 0|



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Asked 11/18/2012 1:09:35 AM
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