Question and answer
describe ways of checking whether an individual with learning disabilities has understood a communication, and how to address any misunderstandings
How to Avoid Misunderstanding S.Y. Bowland describes how subtle racial or gender bias can lead to misunderstandings. In conflict situations, avoiding misunderstanding takes a lot of effort. [ Roger Fisher and William Ury list four skills that can improve communication in conflict situations. * The first is active listening. The goal of active listening, they say, is to understand your
opponent as well as you understand yourself. Pay close attention to what the other side is saying. Ask the opponent to clarify or repeat anything that is unclear or seems unreasonable (maybe it isn't, but you are interpreting it wrong). Attempt to repeat their case, as they have presented it, back to them. This shows that you are listening (which suggests that you care what they have to say) and that you understand what they have said. It does not indicate that you agree with what they said, nor do you have to. You just need to indicate that you do understand them. * Fisher and Ury's second rule is to speak directly to your opponent. This is not considered appropriate in some cultures, but when permitted, it helps to increase understanding. Avoid being distracted by others, or by other things going on in the same room. Focus on what you have to say, and on saying it in a way that your opponent can understand. * Their third rule is to speak about yourself, not about your opponent. Describe your own feelings and perceptions, rather than focusing on your opponent's motives, misdeeds, or failings. By saying, "I felt let down," rather than "You broke your promise," you will convey the same information, in a way that does not provoke a defensive or hostile reaction from your opponent. This is often referred to as using "I-statements" or "I-messages," rather than "you-messages." You-messages suggest blame, and encourage the recipient to deny wrongdoing or to blame in return. I-messages simply state a problem, without blaming someone for it. ]
Expert answered|jomsday|Points 375|
Question
Asked 4/18/2012 9:23:20 AM
0 Answers/Comments
Get an answer
New answers
Rating

There are no new answers.

Comments

There are no comments.

Add an answer or comment
Log in or sign up first.
Questions asked by the same visitor
describe ways of checking whether an individual has understood a comminication, and how to address any misundestandings
Weegy: Social conflicts often involve some misunderstanding. Parties in conflict communicate by what they say (or do not say) and how they behave toward each other. [ Even normal interaction may involve faulty communication, but conflict seems to worsen the problem. When two people are in conflict, they often make negative assumptions about "the other." Consequently, a statement that might have seemed innocuous when two parties were friends might seem hostile or threatening when the same parties are in conflict. Sources of Misunderstanding All communication has two parts: a sender and a receiver. The sender has a message he or she intends to transmit, and s/he puts it in words, which, to her/him, best reflect what s/he is thinking. But many things can intervene to prevent the intended message from being received accurately. Frank Blechmanstates that surprises offer the intervenor a chance to re-assess the assumptions he/she has made about a conflict. If the communication is verbal, tone of voice can influence interpretation. The boss's words, "Hey, I noticed you were taking an especially long break this morning," could be interpreted as an attack if she or he said that in a disapproving tone, while the comment might be seen as a minor reminder about office rules if it was said in a friendly way. If the employee has a health problem that sometimes requires long breaks, the comment might have even been a friendly inquiry about what was happening and whether the employee needed any help. Here, tone of voice as well as situational and relationship factors would influence the interpretation of the message. Nonverbal cues also are important. Is the sender's posture open and friendly, or closed and cold? Is her facial expression friendly or accusatory? All of these factors influence how the same words will be received. In addition to how the message is sent, many additional factors determine how the receiver interprets the message. All new information we learn is ... (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 4/18/2012 9:19:59 AM
0 Answers/Comments
17,968,442 questions answered
Popular Conversations
How is the infinitive phrase used in the sentence? Morning is the ...
Weegy: To go to college is my greatest ambition. The infinitive phrase "to go to college" is used as noun as subject. ...
10/24/2014 11:04:05 AM| 5 Answers
Brandon's huge collection of paper cranes come from his origami ...
Weegy: The correct sentence is: Brandon's huge collection of paper cranes comes from his origami hobby. User: ...
10/24/2014 7:48:30 AM| 3 Answers
William H. Crawford represented which ...
10/24/2014 7:25:41 AM| 2 Answers
Is the sentence compound, or is it simple with a compound verb? You ...
Weegy: Verb is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action (bring, read, walk, run, learn), an occurrence ...
10/24/2014 7:51:29 AM| 2 Answers
Which words are the first and last words of the participial phrase in ...
Weegy: Strapped into the roller coaster, I screamed in fear through the whole ride. The first and last words of the ...
10/24/2014 10:27:22 AM| 2 Answers
Weegy Stuff
S
L
1
1
1
1
L
1
L
Points 2605 [Total 14980]| Ratings 0| Comments 2605| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
1
L
P
C
1
P
C
1
L
Points 1628 [Total 11109]| Ratings 4| Comments 1588| Invitations 0|Offline
S
1
L
1
L
P
P
L
Points 896 [Total 13125]| Ratings 0| Comments 896| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
Points 605 [Total 2004]| Ratings 0| Comments 605| Invitations 0|Offline
S
1
L
L
Points 505 [Total 6299]| Ratings 3| Comments 475| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 482 [Total 482]| Ratings 0| Comments 452| Invitations 3|Offline
S
Points 454 [Total 455]| Ratings 6| Comments 394| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 277 [Total 277]| Ratings 1| Comments 267| Invitations 0|Offline
S
P
C
L
P
L
1
Points 48 [Total 6282]| Ratings 0| Comments 48| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
Points 34 [Total 3572]| Ratings 2| Comments 14| Invitations 0|Offline
Home | Contact | Blog | About | Terms | Privacy | Social | ©2014 Purple Inc.