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Q: 1. In what ways is the Holy Land an important site for all three monotheistic faiths?
A: For christians, it is the city were Jesus was crusified and where he also rose from the death. For Muslims, it is the place where Mohammad ascended to the heavens to meet God. [ For Jews, King David had named it and it was where Solomon had built the temple and also the wailing is in this city. ]
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User: 1. In what ways is the Holy Land an important site for all three monotheistic faiths?

Weegy: For christians, it is the city were Jesus was crusified and where he also rose from the death. For Muslims, it is the place where Mohammad ascended to the heavens to meet God. [ For Jews, King David had named it and it was where Solomon had built the temple and also the wailing is in this city. ]
Sting|Points 252|

User: 1. The three major monotheistic religions are sometimes described as branches of the same family tree. If this is true, how would you describe the trunk of the tree?

Weegy: Monotheism is the belief in a singular God, in contrast to polytheism, the belief in several deities. Polytheism can, however, be reconcilable with inclusive monotheism (monolatrism) or other forms of monism. [ The distinction between inclusive monotheism and polytheism is not clear or objective in light of that. ]
dickmich9|Points 320|

User: How are the three major holy books of the monotheistic faiths both similar and different

Weegy: udaism, Christianity, and Islam have many differences. [ First and foremost, although all branches of Christianity claim to be monotheistic, this can be a point of contention among Muslims and Jews; Christianity claims to worship the same God that worshipped in Jewish and Muslim practice - and indeed does. However, the trinity concept is foreign and incompatible with monotheism, from the perspective of either of the other two world religions. Even within Christianity, this concept is frought with explanatory difficulties, such as verbage to the following effect: 'one God in three persons,' 'a unity of three persons,' 'a trinity of one,' 'a tri-une Godhead,' etc. Within Christianity, it is generally accepted that this does not imply polytheism, but rather probes the complicated nature of God. Outside of Christianity, this is not necessarily certain. Thus, while Islam and Judaism (their other disagreements notwithstanding), mutually acknowledge each other as monotheistic, sharing one same God... officially, neither is entirely sure about Christianity. Read more: ]
MrG|Points 1436|

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Asked 10/11/2012 11:01:54 AM
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