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Q: Determine which level of measurement— nominal, ordinal, interval, or ratio—is used in the following examples. • Students are asked to rank computer manufacturers.
A: Nominal numbers (sometimes called categorical numbers) are numerals used for identification only. The numerical value is irrelevant, and they do not indicate quantity, rank, or any other measurement. [ Example would be ZIP code Ordinal numbers represent rank in a particular order Interval is a set of real numbers with the property that any number that lies between two numbers in the set is also
included in the set. For example, the set of all numbers x satisfying 0 ? x ? 1 is an interval which contains 0 and 1, as well as all numbers between them. Other examples of intervals are the set of all real numbers , the set of all negative real numbers, and the empty set. Ratio is a relationship between two numbers of the same kind[1] (i.e., objects, persons, students, spoonfuls, units of whatever identical dimension), usually expressed as "a to b" or a:b, sometimes expressed arithmetically as a dimensionless quotient of the two[2] which explicitly indicates how many times the first number contains the second (not necessarily an integer).[3 ]
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User: Determine which level of measurement— nominal, ordinal, interval, or ratio—is used in the following examples. • Students are asked to rank computer manufacturers.

Weegy: Nominal numbers (sometimes called categorical numbers) are numerals used for identification only. The numerical value is irrelevant, and they do not indicate quantity, rank, or any other measurement. [ Example would be ZIP code Ordinal numbers represent rank in a particular order Interval is a set of real numbers with the property that any number that lies between two numbers in the set is also included in the set. For example, the set of all numbers x satisfying 0 ? x ? 1 is an interval which contains 0 and 1, as well as all numbers between them. Other examples of intervals are the set of all real numbers , the set of all negative real numbers, and the empty set. Ratio is a relationship between two numbers of the same kind[1] (i.e., objects, persons, students, spoonfuls, units of whatever identical dimension), usually expressed as "a to b" or a:b, sometimes expressed arithmetically as a dimensionless quotient of the two[2] which explicitly indicates how many times the first number contains the second (not necessarily an integer).[3 ]
japs2310qa|Points 1979|

User: • Students are asked to rank computer manufacturers.

Weegy: a person, group, or company that owns or runs a manufacturing plant. 2. a person, group, or company that manufactures.
selymi|Points 9266|

User: Determine which level of measurement— nominal, ordinal, interval, or ratio—is used in the following examples. • Students are asked to rank computer manufacturers?

Weegy: Nominal numbers (sometimes called categorical numbers) are numerals used for identification only. The numerical value is irrelevant, and they do not indicate quantity, rank, or any other measurement. [ Example would be ZIP code Ordinal numbers represent rank in a particular order Interval is a set of real numbers with the property that any number that lies between two numbers in the set is also included in the set. For example, the set of all numbers x satisfying 0 ? x ? 1 is an interval which contains 0 and 1, as well as all numbers between them. Other examples of intervals are the set of all real numbers , the set of all negative real numbers, and the empty set. Ratio is a relationship between two numbers of the same kind[1] (i.e., objects, persons, students, spoonfuls, units of whatever identical dimension), usually expressed as "a to b" or a:b, sometimes expressed arithmetically as a dimensionless quotient of the two[2] which explicitly indicates how many times the first number contains the second (not necessarily an integer).[3 ]
japs2310qa|Points 1979|

User: Which sampling method—simple random, systematic, stratified, cluster, convenience, judgment, quota, or snowball—is most appropriate for the following examples? • The unemployment rate is calculated each month by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The survey consists of 50,000 households in about 2,000 counties and cities in all 50 states?

Weegy: Convenience sampling.
Fanboy|Points 2821|

User: Which sampling method—simple random, systematic, stratified, cluster, convenience, judgment, quota, or snowball—is most appropriate for the following examples? • A researcher for Kraft Foods selects five states randomly, and then selects 10 supermarkets chains within each state to call for a phone survey as test markets for a new cookie?

Weegy: that is Quota [ ] -
salas_jessy|Points 67|

User: Which sampling method—simple random, systematic, stratified, cluster, convenience, judgment, quota, or snowball—is most appropriate for the following examples? • A new product researcher would like to investigate the use of virtual teams. After conducting an interview with a manager, she asks for the names of other managers that use virtual teams?

Weegy: Cluster
MrG|Points 1765|

User: Which sampling method—simple random, systematic, stratified, cluster, convenience, judgment, quota, or snowball—is most appropriate for the following examples? • A news reporter asks people on the street their opinion about the president’s new bill.

Weegy: cluster,
lailalayos|Points 70|

User: Which sampling method—simple random, systematic, stratified, cluster, convenience, judgment, quota, or snowball—is most appropriate for the following examples?• Jamie select Denver, Colorado; Chicago, Illinois; and San Diego, California as test markets for a new potato chip line base on her experience with these markets.

Weegy: Cluster
esorense|Points 160|

User: What is the hypothesis-testing procedure tests?

User: Which hypothesis-testing procedure would you use in the following situations? • A computer company has a brand loyalty rating of 6.8 on a 7 point scale. Is this company’s rating significantly different from the industry average of 6.4?

Weegy: The answer is "Two-tailed One Sample T-Test "
Expert answered|bonaxle|Points 489|

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Asked 11/11/2012 10:56:57 PM
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