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Describe how the company colony governments and proprietor colony governments were set up, and give colony examples of each. Thanks for your atettion!
Weegy: what type of colony are you referring to? (More)
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Asked 5/29/2012 5:47:14 AM
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Hi there! How are? Can you help me out here? If you do, thanks: Describe how the company colony governments and proprietor colony governments were set up, and give colony examples of each
Weegy: The thirteen colonies are usually grouped, according to the form of government, into three classes- the Charter, the Royal, and the Proprietary; but recent historical criticism has reduced these three forms to two, [ the Corporation and the Proviucial.1 The corporation was identical with the charter form, and at the opening of the Revolution there were but three, including Massachusetts2 the other two being Rhode Island and Connecticut. The provincial forms included the proprietary colonies, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware, and the royal colonies, Virginia, the Carolinas, New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, and Georgia. So variable were the forms of colonial government that but two colonies remained under the same form from the time of their founding to the Revolutionary War. These two were the chartered colonies of Rhode Island and Connecticut. It will be noticed that at the close of the colonial period the royal form of government predominated, seven of the thirteen being of this class. The movement against the chartered and proprietary colonies that brought about this condition was begun late in the reign of Charles II, was kept up for half a century, and ended in 1729 when the Carolinas became royal provinces. One colony, Georgia, was founded after this time, and, after flourishing for nineteen years as a proprietary colony, was passed over to the Crown (1752) according to the terms of its charter. Massachusetts was the first to fall a victim to this new policy, losing its charter in 1684. On receiving its new charter, in 1691, Massachusetts became a semi-royal province, and is by some writers placed in a class by itself. New York, New Jersey, and the Carolinas passed into royal hands during this crusade, and even the governments of Pennsylvania and Maryland were each for a short time taken from their respective proprietors. By leaving out of consideration the two self-governing colonies, Rhode Island and Connecticut,3 we find the colonial ... (More)
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Asked 5/29/2012 5:54:48 AM
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