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Analyze information about relationships among Congress, the military bureaucracies, and defense industries
Military?industrial complex, or military?industrial?congressional complex[1], is a concept commonly used to refer to policy and monetary relationships between legislators, national armed forces, and the defense industrial base that supports them. [ These relationships include political contributions, political approval for defense spending, lobbying to support bureaucracies, and oversight of the
industry. It is a type of iron triangle. The term is most often used in reference to the system behind the military of the United States, where it gained popularity after its use in the farewell address of President Dwight D. Eisenhower on January 17, 1961, though the term is applicable to any country with a similarly developed infrastructure. The term is sometimes used more broadly to include the entire network of contracts and flows of money and resources among individuals as well as corporations and institutions of the defense contractors, The Pentagon, the Congress and executive branch. This sector is intrinsically prone to principal?agent problem, moral hazard, and rent seeking. Cases of political corruption have also surfaced with regularity. A parallel system is that of the Military?industrial?media complex, along with the more distant Politico-media complex and Prison-industrial complex. A similar thesis was originally expressed by Daniel Gu?rin, in his 1936 book Fascism and Big Business, about the fascist government support to heavy industry. It can be defined as, "an informal and changing coalition of groups with vested psychological, moral, and material interests in the continuous development and maintenance of high levels of weaponry, in preservation of colonial markets and in military-strategic conceptions of internal affairs."[2] ]
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User: Analyze information about relationships among Congress, the military bureaucracies, and defense industries

Weegy: Military?industrial complex, or military?industrial?congressional complex[1], is a concept commonly used to refer to policy and monetary relationships between legislators, national armed forces, and the defense industrial base that supports them. [ These relationships include political contributions, political approval for defense spending, lobbying to support bureaucracies, and oversight of the industry. It is a type of iron triangle. The term is most often used in reference to the system behind the military of the United States, where it gained popularity after its use in the farewell address of President Dwight D. Eisenhower on January 17, 1961, though the term is applicable to any country with a similarly developed infrastructure. The term is sometimes used more broadly to include the entire network of contracts and flows of money and resources among individuals as well as corporations and institutions of the defense contractors, The Pentagon, the Congress and executive branch. This sector is intrinsically prone to principal?agent problem, moral hazard, and rent seeking. Cases of political corruption have also surfaced with regularity. A parallel system is that of the Military?industrial?media complex, along with the more distant Politico-media complex and Prison-industrial complex. A similar thesis was originally expressed by Daniel Gu?rin, in his 1936 book Fascism and Big Business, about the fascist government support to heavy industry. It can be defined as, "an informal and changing coalition of groups with vested psychological, moral, and material interests in the continuous development and maintenance of high levels of weaponry, in preservation of colonial markets and in military-strategic conceptions of internal affairs."[2] ]
rocketmail|Points 363|

User: draw your own conclusion and support it with facts and persuasive reasoning about the impact of these relationships on defense spending





Weegy: These kinds of information are not publicly available
Expert answered|uxiali|Points 1101|

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Asked 1/2/2013 2:34:44 PM
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