Question and answer
Question not found
Ask a question
Not a good answer? Get an answer now. (Free)
New answers
Rating

There are no new answers.

Comments

There are no comments.

Add an answer or comment
Log in or sign up first.
Questions asked by the same visitor
What is the writer's opinion of poetry in this passage from an essay?
Weegy: What passage and essay? (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 6/18/2013 5:16:04 AM
0 Answers/Comments
What is the writer's opinion of poetry in this passage from an essay?
Weegy: The Study of Poetry (1880) BY MATTHEW ARNOLD INTRODUCTION Matthew Arnold was one of the foremost poets and critics of the 19th century. [ While often regarded as the father of modern literary criticism, he also wrote extensively on social and cultural issues, religion, and education. Arnold was born into an influential English family—his father was a famed headmaster at Rugby—and graduated from Balliol College, Oxford. He began his career as a school inspector, traveling throughout much of England on the newly built railway system. When he was elected professor of poetry at Oxford in 1857, he was the first in the post to deliver his lectures in English rather than Latin. Walt Whitman famously dismissed him as a “literary dude,” and while many have continued to disparage Arnold for his moralistic tone and literary judgments, his work also laid the foundation for important 20th century critics like T.S. Eliot, Cleanth Brooks, and Harold Bloom. His poetry has also had an enormous, though underappreciated, influence; Arnold is frequently acknowledged as being one of the first poets to display a truly Modern perspective in his work. Perhaps Arnold’s most famous piece of literary criticism is his essay “The Study of Poetry.” In this work, Arnold is fundamentally concerned with poetry’s “high destiny;” he believes that “mankind will discover that we have to turn to poetry to interpret life for us, to console us, to sustain us” as science and philosophy will eventually prove flimsy and unstable. Arnold’s essay thus concerns itself with articulating a “high standard” and “strict judgment” in order to avoid the fallacy of valuing certain poems (and poets) too highly, and lays out a method for discerning only the best and therefore “classic” poets (as distinct from the description of writers of the ancient world). Arnold’s classic poets include Milton, Shakespeare, Dante, and Homer; and the passages he presents from each are intended to show how their poetry is ... (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 6/18/2013 5:18:32 AM
0 Answers/Comments
Syntax
Question
Not Answered
Updated 260 days ago|9/12/2015 3:09:02 AM
1 Answer/Comment
In linguistics, syntax is the set of rules, principles, and processes that govern the structure of sentences in a given language.
Added 260 days ago|9/12/2015 2:53:32 AM
This answer has been confirmed as correct, not copied, and helpful.
Confirmed by Andrew. [9/12/2015 3:08:53 AM]
What is the effect of syntax in this line? He drank rum—five glasses regularly every evening.
Weegy: Answer: Syntax revolves around words. More specifically it focuses on how words are arranged in a sentence. Words can be arranged regularly or irregularly for a variety of reasons to fulfill a purpose. [ Examining syntax can reveal a lot about the writer, such as skill, culture and meaning. Syntax can be used to convey a simple message or to convey something deeper and more poetic. Function of Syntax Syntax refers to sentence structure. It is basically how words are arranged in a sentence and how a writer has created a pattern with the words. Syntax shows a writer's style by showing how he creates patterns of words. Use of syntax can also show a writer's skill because word patterns and sentence structures need to be modified at times to fit certain types of writing. Often writers like to experiment with syntax in their writing to provide emphasis or to create a deeper meaning using word patterns. Many examples follow to show the function of syntax. Types of Syntax Regular or normal syntax consists of a sentence with a basic pattern of a subject, verb and object. This pattern is often fixed in normal syntax, meaning that the order of words in a sentence must be subject, verb, object. A simple example: The girl held a puppy. Another type of syntax is irregular syntax, in which writers place words in varying order to create emphasis or to explore further meaning in their words. An example of irregular syntax from the Thomas Hardy poem "The Man He Killed": "Yes; quaint and curious war is!" Read more: ] (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 6/19/2013 6:25:04 AM
0 Answers/Comments
What does the following dialogue reveal about Theodoric’s state of mind?
Weegy: Please provide the dialogue for reference in answering your question. Thank you. (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 6/19/2013 9:47:14 AM
0 Answers/Comments
25,356,569 questions answered
Popular Conversations
What is sfumato?
5/28/2016 9:44:10 AM| 2 Answers
The main purpose of a budget is to
5/28/2016 9:20:36 PM| 2 Answers
An acceptance is complete and effective only when it has been- - ...
Weegy: An acceptance is complete and effective only when it has been communicated to the offerer.
5/28/2016 11:54:15 PM| 2 Answers
coercive
Weegy: The Coercive Acts were meant to reverse the trend of colonial resistance but actually provoked higher levels of ...
5/29/2016 3:19:03 AM| 2 Answers
Simplify -7 + [5 + (-12)÷3] -6 -34/3 -8
5/28/2016 1:03:54 AM| 1 Answers
Weegy Stuff
S
Points 711 [Total 711] Ratings 10 Comments 591 Invitations 2 Online
S
Points 697 [Total 697] Ratings 13 Comments 567 Invitations 0 Online
S
Points 643 [Total 643] Ratings 0 Comments 643 Invitations 0 Offline
S
1
L
L
P
R
P
L
P
P
R
Points 295 [Total 12547] Ratings 2 Comments 275 Invitations 0 Offline
S
L
P
P
P
Points 166 [Total 3543] Ratings 0 Comments 166 Invitations 0 Offline
S
Points 38 [Total 107] Ratings 0 Comments 38 Invitations 0 Offline
S
Points 12 [Total 12] Ratings 1 Comments 2 Invitations 0 Offline
S
Points 10 [Total 10] Ratings 1 Comments 0 Invitations 0 Offline
S
L
Points 7 [Total 4099] Ratings 0 Comments 7 Invitations 0 Offline
S
Points 6 [Total 6] Ratings 0 Comments 6 Invitations 0 Offline
* Excludes moderators and previous
winners (Include)
Home | Contact | Blog | About | Terms | Privacy | © Purple Inc.