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Q: How do you think assumptions might interfere with critical thinking?
A: at first glance, assumptions may not seem like they belong in the critical thinking process. [ However, your assumptions are a key factor because they give you quite a bit to think critically about! In your critical thinking, [ you need to take any assumptions you have and question them as you try to substantiate them or unsubstantiate them. With critical thinking and assumptions, it's also
important to understand what an inference is and how it relates to the entire process. Inference: A conclusion you come to in your mind based on something else that is true or you believe to be true Assumption: Part of your belief system. Something you don't question. Your mind takes for granted that your assumption is true Your beliefs (assumptions) cause you to come to conclusions (inferences). Your inferences then cause you to act accordingly. Ex. If I walk toward you with my hand out and smiling, you'll probably infer that I intend to shake your hand. Your assumption of my intent is based on similar experiences from your past. Those past events formed your belief about such situations. ]
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Original conversation
User: How do you think assumptions might interfere with critical thinking?

Weegy: at first glance, assumptions may not seem like they belong in the critical thinking process. [ However, your assumptions are a key factor because they give you quite a bit to think critically about! In your critical thinking, [ you need to take any assumptions you have and question them as you try to substantiate them or unsubstantiate them. With critical thinking and assumptions, it's also important to understand what an inference is and how it relates to the entire process. Inference: A conclusion you come to in your mind based on something else that is true or you believe to be true Assumption: Part of your belief system. Something you don't question. Your mind takes for granted that your assumption is true Your beliefs (assumptions) cause you to come to conclusions (inferences). Your inferences then cause you to act accordingly. Ex. If I walk toward you with my hand out and smiling, you'll probably infer that I intend to shake your hand. Your assumption of my intent is based on similar experiences from your past. Those past events formed your belief about such situations. ]
gdemra|Points 136|

User: What might you do to avoid making assumptions in your thinking

Weegy: One of the biggest detriments to good communication is making assumptions. Calling it a ?detriment? is putting it nicely. Assumptions can be annoying, frustrating, hurtful, painful, and destructive. [ They prevent us from seeing clearly, and they can cause us to put others into boxes or frameworks so strong that we can no longer see the realty in front of us. Assumptions can destroy relationships, organizations, governments, and they can even cause wars. An assumption is a belief that?s taken for granted, an idea or concept that we believe is true. It can involve a knee-jerk emotional reaction based on previous experiences, and we promptly place a judgment, an evaluation, or an appraisal on something or someone. Our thoughts and behavior follow. Sometimes the assumption is correct or safe to make. If a character on a dark street late at night looks like he?s waving a knife around, it?s sensible to assume it?s a dangerous situation. Sometimes the assumption is understandable, even if incorrect and potentially life-threatening. At an office party, if your coworker is staggering around, bumping into people and walls, acting confused, and getting aggressive, you might think she?s drunk, but she could be in diabetic shock. more ]
latefisher|Points 2418|

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Asked 7/14/2012 9:01:04 PM
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