Question and answer
the literary devices found in epitaph by dennis scott
Allusion.
Expert answered|Fanboy|Points 1811|
Question
Asked 6/12/2012 8:20:34 AM
0 Answers/Comments
Get an answer
New answers
Rating

There are no new answers.

Comments

There are no comments.

Add an answer or comment
Log in or sign up first.
Questions asked by the same visitor
What are the literary devices found in sonnet 18
Weegy: The speaker opens the poem with a question addressed to the beloved: "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" The next eleven lines are devoted to such a comparison. [ In line 2, the speaker stipulates what mainly differentiates the young man from the summer's day: he is "more lovely and more temperate." Summer's days tend toward extremes: they are shaken by "rough winds"; in them, the sun ("the eye of heaven") often shines "too hot," or too dim. And summer is fleeting: its date is too short, and it leads to the withering of autumn, as "every fair from fair sometime declines." The final quatrain of the sonnet tells how the beloved differs from the summer in that respect: his beauty will last forever ("Thy eternal summer shall not fade...") and never die. In the couplet, the speaker explains how the beloved's beauty will accomplish this feat, and not perish because it is preserved in the poem, which will last forever; it will live "as long as men can breathe or eyes can see." **************************************… On the surface, the poem is simply a statement of praise about the beauty of the beloved; summer tends to unpleasant extremes of windiness and heat, but the beloved is always mild and temperate. Summer is incidentally personified as the "eye of heaven" with its "gold complexion"; the imagery throughout is simple and unaffected, with the "darling buds of May" giving way to the "eternal summer", which the speaker promises the beloved. The language, too, is comparatively unadorned for the sonnets; it is not heavy with alliteration or assonance, and nearly every line is its own self-contained clause- almost every line ends with some punctuation, which effects a pause. Sonnet 18 is the first poem in the sonnets not to explicitly encourage the young man to have children. The "procreation" sequence of the first 17 sonnets ended with the speaker's realization that the young man might not need children to preserve his beauty; Sonnet 18, then, is the ... (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 6/12/2012 7:44:10 AM
0 Answers/Comments
identify the literary devices found in it is a beauteous evening by william wordsworth
Weegy: "It is a beauteous Evening," by William Wordsworth is a Petrarchan sonnet, and written in August of 1802. Wordsworth composed the sonnet on the beach near Calais. [ This sonnet emphasizes the individual communing with nature, and it is a natural setting at the seashore. Wordsworth paints this canvas with imagery and poetic skill. The Romantics considered communing with nature as being one with God; they saw God in nature. This fourteen line sonnet is spontaneous, simplistic, and individualistic. The sonnet is about a beautiful yet free evening that is as quiet "As a nun." The immense sun is admiring all that lies below yet is setting. The ocean waves are compared to the "Gentleness of heaven." Wordsworth asks his daughter Caroline to "Listen!" In the sound of the eternal sea waves; God is found. The noise of the crashing waves "Sound like thunder," and they are everlasting, like God. Wordsworth asks the "Dear child," who is innocent, and therefore, closer to divinity to "Listen!". The child lies in "Abraham's bosom;" Abraham's bosom is Christ's description of the resting place for heaven bound souls (Luke 16.22). The child worships at the "Temples inner shrine," which is nature. God is with Caroline "When [she] know it not." The rhyming scheme is ABBAACCA in the octave, which is the first eight lines. The volta occurs at the end of line eight, which states "A sound like thundereverlastingly," and beginning of line nine, which asks, "Dear Child! dear Girl!" The sestet, final six lines, rhyming scheme is DEFDFE. The sonnet is written in iambic pentameter, but there are variations in line three, which start with a trochaic reversal, iamb, iamb, anapest, and single spondee. The poet wished to highlight the breathlessness of nature and the "Broad sun." Line five consists of all iambs, except for the last foot which is an anapest, and highlights the gentleness "On the sea." Line six starts with a trochaic reversal, and the poet is asking the reader to "Listen!" ... (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 6/12/2012 8:15:22 AM
0 Answers/Comments
17,584,815 questions answered
Popular Conversations
A list of potential sources of information for a paper is a(n) ...
Weegy: A list of potential sources of information for a paper in annotated bibliography. User: An index to ...
9/29/2014 2:50:04 PM| 4 Answers
You've settled on an idea for an essay to write. What should you do ...
Weegy: D.) Conduct interviews, do some research, ask questions, and make a plan. User: To make sure your reader ...
9/29/2014 5:55:28 PM| 4 Answers
What is the square root of 6000?
9/29/2014 2:39:45 PM| 3 Answers
Because the subject of a composition is like a crystal with many ...
Weegy: Because the subject of a composition is like a crystal with many facets, you should A. offer your reader ideas ...
9/29/2014 7:06:34 PM| 3 Answers
In the Roman Republic, ____________ did not have power in the ...
Weegy: In the Roman Republic,non-citizens did not have power in the government.
9/29/2014 5:48:03 AM| 2 Answers
-2(4x + 1)= -8x + 2
9/29/2014 7:08:45 AM| 2 Answers
Weegy Stuff
S
R
L
1
1
P
C
1
P
1
1
L
P
C
P
C
1
P
C
L
P
C
1
P
C
P
C
P
C
L
Points 3211 [Total 27609]| Ratings 8| Comments 3131| Invitations 0|Online
S
L
1
L
P
C
1
Points 2919 [Total 9450]| Ratings 12| Comments 2799| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
C
P
C
1
L
L
P
C
1
Points 2715 [Total 18654]| Ratings 18| Comments 2535| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
P
C
L
P
C
P
C
L
P
C
P
C
P
C
Points 2659 [Total 19831]| Ratings 12| Comments 2539| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
1
1
1
1
L
1
L
Points 2548 [Total 12328]| Ratings 0| Comments 2548| Invitations 0|Offline
S
1
L
1
L
P
P
L
Points 917 [Total 12163]| Ratings 0| Comments 917| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
P
C
P
C
1
L
P
C
L
P
C
P
C
P
C
P
C
Points 864 [Total 19395]| Ratings 2| Comments 844| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
Points 729 [Total 1398]| Ratings 0| Comments 729| Invitations 0|Offline
S
1
L
L
Points 632 [Total 5755]| Ratings 4| Comments 592| Invitations 0|Offline
S
P
C
L
P
L
1
Points 173 [Total 6230]| Ratings 2| Comments 153| Invitations 0|Offline
Home | Contact | Blog | About | Terms | Privacy | Social | ©2014 Purple Inc.