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Q: 1. Give a brief explanation of Freud's model of personality, including the id, ego, and superego.
A: Structural Model (id, ego, superego) According to Freud, we are born with our Id. The id is an important part of our personality because as newborns, it allows us to get our basic needs met. [ Freud believed that the id is based on our pleasure principle. In other words, the id wants whatever feels good at the time, with no consideration for the reality of the situation. When a child is
hungry, the id wants food, and therefore the child cries. When the child needs to be changed, the id cries. When the child is uncomfortable, in pain, too hot, too cold, or just wants attention, the id speaks up until his or her needs are met. The id doesn't care about reality, about the needs of anyone else, only its own satisfaction. If you think about it, babies are not real considerate of their parents' wishes. They have no care for time, whether their parents are sleeping, relaxing, eating dinner, or bathing. When the id wants something, nothing else is important. Within the next three years, as the child interacts more and more with the world, the second part of the personality begins to develop. Freud called this part the Ego. The ego is based on the reality principle. The ego understands that other people have needs and desires and that sometimes being impulsive or selfish can hurt us in the long run. Its the ego's job to meet the needs of the id, while taking into consideration the reality of the situation. By the age of five, or the end of the phallic stage of development, the Superego develops. The Superego is the moral part of us and develops due to the moral and ethical restraints placed on us by our caregivers. Many equate the superego with the conscience as it dictates our belief of right and wrong. ]
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User: 1. Give a brief explanation of Freud's model of personality, including the id, ego, and superego.

Weegy: Structural Model (id, ego, superego) According to Freud, we are born with our Id. The id is an important part of our personality because as newborns, it allows us to get our basic needs met. [ Freud believed that the id is based on our pleasure principle. In other words, the id wants whatever feels good at the time, with no consideration for the reality of the situation. When a child is hungry, the id wants food, and therefore the child cries. When the child needs to be changed, the id cries. When the child is uncomfortable, in pain, too hot, too cold, or just wants attention, the id speaks up until his or her needs are met. The id doesn't care about reality, about the needs of anyone else, only its own satisfaction. If you think about it, babies are not real considerate of their parents' wishes. They have no care for time, whether their parents are sleeping, relaxing, eating dinner, or bathing. When the id wants something, nothing else is important. Within the next three years, as the child interacts more and more with the world, the second part of the personality begins to develop. Freud called this part the Ego. The ego is based on the reality principle. The ego understands that other people have needs and desires and that sometimes being impulsive or selfish can hurt us in the long run. Its the ego's job to meet the needs of the id, while taking into consideration the reality of the situation. By the age of five, or the end of the phallic stage of development, the Superego develops. The Superego is the moral part of us and develops due to the moral and ethical restraints placed on us by our caregivers. Many equate the superego with the conscience as it dictates our belief of right and wrong. ]
jameshand|Points 1949|

User: 2. Give a brief explanation of one of the Neo-Freudian psychoanalytic theories, including the theorist and key concepts.

Weegy: The term Neo-Freudians (New Freudians) is often used to describe those psychoanalysts who changed Freud's original theory in some way, both before and after Freud's death. [ Realize however, that all of the Neo-Freudians accepted the bulk of Freud's ideas; they simply made some modifications. Below we will look at a few Neo-Freudians. Read more: ]
batotoy|Points 1475|

User: 3. Give a brief explanation of one of the learning theories including the theorist and key concepts.

Weegy: Behaviorism is a worldview that operates on a principle of ?stimulus-response.? All behavior caused by external stimuli (operant conditioning). [ All behavior can be explained without the need to consider internal mental states or consciousness. Originators and important contributors: John B. Watson, Ivan Pavlov, B.F. Skinner, E. L. Thorndike (connectionism), Bandura, Tolman (moving toward cognitivism). Behaviorism is a worldview that assumes a learner is essentially passive, responding to environmental stimuli. The learner starts off as a clean slate (i.e. tabula rasa) and behavior is shaped through positive reinforcement or negative reinforcement. Both positive reinforcement and negative reinforcement increase the probability that the antecedent behavior will happen again. In contrast, punishment (both positive and negative) decreases the likelihood that the antecedent behavior will happen again. Positive indicates the application of a stimulus; Negative indicates the withholding of a stimulus. Learning is therefore defined as a change in behavior in the learner. Lots of (early) behaviorist work was done with animals (e.g. Pavlov?s dogs) and generalized to humans. Behaviorism precedes the cognitivist worldview. It rejects structuralism and is an extension of Logical Positivism. ]
vcj2028|Points 181|

User: 4. Give a brief explanation of one of the humanistic theories including the theorist and key concepts.

Weegy: People develop through conditioned with stimuli, rewards, [ [ and punishments; Learning focuses on behavior due to the environment; Focuses on the experimental method and observational; Dreams are not empirical; Only focuses on reason for simple behavior and some predictive value of behavior. Key Concepts/Ideas Animals can be conditioned to be in anyway Operant conditioning, and classical conditioning. Social learning theory introduced insight, latent learning, and models Insight: When, after encountering a problem for some time, new ideas arise in order to solve it Latent Learning: Concepts may be learned but not used until reinforcer is added. Models: Subjects learn from watching other people and copying the ways they behave. Key Theorists and Their Contributions Ivan Pavlov was the first experimenter to research classical conditioning. In what started as a simple, physiological experiment with a dog, turned out to be the discovery of what came to be known as conditioning, more specifically, classical conditioning. -He was performing some experiments on a dog, and found that he could ?condition? the dog to salivate on the sound of a bell. After repeatedly ringing the bell, and introducing food. Eventually, the bell alone was sufficient to make the poor pup drip. James Watson was the pioneer psychology theorist that translated the ideas of Pavlov?s classical conditioning to humans. -His famous work is little Albert. He conditioned poor little Albert to reject white fluffy things by continually including LOUD NOISES upon the introduction of the white fluffy thing. Soon enough, the fluffy white thing alone would make little Albert upset. This research introduced the idea of stimulus generalization. Not only the white bunny (for example) would scare the poor baby. White fluffy pillows, etc could also raise fear from Al. Watson was confident that if you gave him a child, he could make him into anything (criminal, business man, etc.) B.F. ] ]
thewolf010|Points 960|

User: Which theory do you believe is the most credible? Why?

Weegy: That depends on what field of theory you are referrring to.
may100|Points 137|

User: Which theory do you believe is the most credible?learning theory Why?

Weegy: That depends on what field of theory you are referrring to.
may100|Points 137|

User: why do you believe that the learning theory is the most credible?lear Why?







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Asked 6/3/2012 10:44:44 AM
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