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Which best explains why our ears can't hear anything in a vacuum? There are no compression waves in a vacuum, so there is nothing to transfer acoustic energy. Molecules in a vacuum become
overcompressed, so sounds occur at too high a frequency for humans to hear. The conditions in a vacuum damage the eardrum and cause permanent hearing loss. The auditory nerve cannot receive messages from the hair cells in a vacuum.
Weegy: Molecules in a vacuum become overcompressed, so sounds occur at too high a frequency for humans to hear. Thanks!
Expert answered|ritaswanski|Points 0|
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Asked 4/5/2013 3:28:10 PM
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