Question and answer
infancy physical changes
An infant's physical development infant begins at the head, then moves to other parts of the body (for example, sucking comes before sitting, [ which comes before walking). Newborn - 2 months Can lift and turn the head when lying on his or her back Hands are fisted, the arms are flexed Neck is unable to support the head when the infant is pulled to a sitting position Primitive reflexes
include: Babinski reflex - toes fan outward when sole of foot is stroked Moro reflex (startle reflex) - extends arms then bends and pulls them in toward body wit a brief cry;, often triggered by loud sounds or sudden movements Palmar hand grasp - infant closes hand and "grips" your finger Placing - leg extends when sole of foot is touched Plantar grasp - infant flexes the toes and forefoot Rooting and sucking - turns head in search of nipple when cheek is touched and begins to suck when nipple touches lips Stepping and walking - takes brisk steps when both feet are placed on a surface, with body supported Tonic neck response - left arm extends when infant gazes to the left, while right arm and leg flex inward, and vice versa 3 - 4 months Better eye-muscle control allows the infant to track objects Begins to control hand and feet actions, but these movements are not fine-tuned. The infant may begin to use both hands, working together, to accomplish tasks. The infant is still unable to coordinate the grasp, but swipes at objects to bring them closer Increased vision allows the infant to tell objects apart from backgrounds with very little contrast (such as a button on a blouse of the same color) Infant raises up (upper torso, shoulders, and head) with arms when lying face down (on tummy) Neck muscles are developed enough to allow the infant to sit with support, and keep head up Primitive reflexes have either already disappeared, or are starting to disappear ]
Expert answered|cutyglyde|Points 401|
Question
Asked 10/19/2013 7:30:35 PM
0 Answers/Comments
Get an answer
New answers
Rating

There are no new answers.

Comments

There are no comments.

Add an answer or comment
Log in or sign up first.
Questions asked by the same visitor
State your position on the issue of how to meet the country’s energy needs. Should the country explore alternative sources or further develop conventional sources
Weegy: Most developing countries have abundant renewable energy resources, including solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, and biomass, as well as the ability to manufacture the relatively labor-intensive systems that harness these. [ By developing such energy sources developing countries can reduce their dependence on oil and natural gas, creating energy portfolios that are less vulnerable to price rises. In many circumstances, these investments can be less expensive than fossil fuel energy systems. You can fine more information here: ] (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 10/14/2013 12:30:23 AM
0 Answers/Comments
what do stereotype mean
Question
Updated 325 days ago|8/14/2014 8:24:33 AM
1 Answer/Comment
Stereotype is a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing.
Added 325 days ago|8/14/2014 8:24:33 AM
This answer has been confirmed as correct, not copied, and helpful.
Describe how those thinking habits may also bias the arguments you offer when you defend your perspective on the issue.
Weegy: Biased search, interpretation and memory have been invoked to explain attitude polarization (when a disagreement becomes more extreme even though the different parties are exposed to the same evidence) (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 10/14/2013 1:50:46 AM
0 Answers/Comments
infancy Cognitive changes
Weegy: s people age, they change in a myriad of ways ? both biological and psychological. Some of these changes may be for the better, and others are not. [ This book primarily concerns the normally aging brain, the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological changes that occur with age, and the mechanisms that account for them. It is not primarily about the behavioral or cognitive concomitants of those changes. Nevertheless, there is ample evidence that alterations in brain structure and function are intimately tied to alterations in cognitive function. The complexity of both the neural and cognitive functions, however, makes exact mapping between brain and behavior extraordinarily difficult, and so these relations remain largely speculative, although ultimately testable. Establishing such links between brain and cognition is the principal goal of cognitive neuroscience. ] User: infancy Socioemotional changes Weegy: The early childhood stage is the time from the end of infancy to around age 5 or 6, during this stage children learn to become more self-sufficient and to develop the basic skills needed to care for themselves, [ they also develop reading skills and spend much time playing with other children and learning social skills. Typically, after entering first grade the early childhood stage ends (Santrock, 2009). Early childhood is an exciting time for both the child and caregivers. During this stage, a child goes through many physical, cognitive and socioemotional changes and developments. ] (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 10/19/2013 7:34:26 PM
0 Answers/Comments
early childhood physical changes
Weegy: Physical Development in Early Childhood: 1.Motor Skill Development -As a child grows, his or her nervous system becomes more mature. As this happens, the child becomes more and more capable of performing increasingly complex actions. [ The rate at which these motor skills emerge is sometimes a worry for parents. There are two types of motor skills: *Gross (or large) motor skills involve the larger muscles including the arms and legs. Actions requiring gross motor skills include walking, running, balance and coordination. *Fine (or small) motor skills involve the smaller muscles in the fingers, toes, eyes and other areas. The actions that require fine motor skills tend to be more intricate, such as drawing, writing, grasping objects, throwing, waving and catching. 2.Physical Growth -Physical development in children follows a directional pattern: *Large muscles develop before small muscles.Muscles in the body's core, legs and arms develop before those in the fingers and hands. *The center of the body develops before the outer regions.Muscles located at the core of the body become stronger and develop sooner than those in the feet and hands. *Development goes from the top down, from the head to the toes.This is why babies learn to hold their heads up before they learn how to crawl. ] (More)
Question
Expert Answered
Asked 10/19/2013 7:43:34 PM
0 Answers/Comments
0 questions answered
Popular Conversations
Write the equivalent fraction and percent for 0.28. User: Write the ...
Weegy: What is the ratio? User: write the fraction 5/7 as a percent
7/5/2015 3:50:39 PM| 3 Answers
Which of the following was NOT a characteristic trait of Mao's ...
Weegy: Maoism is his philosophy. link to it : [ ] User: Which of the following was NOT a characteristic trait of ...
7/5/2015 1:41:46 PM| 2 Answers
The cost of goods sold divided by the average inventory equals the ...
Weegy: Cost of merchandise sold equals beginning inventory : Plus net purchases less ending inventory. User: ...
7/5/2015 3:12:36 PM| 2 Answers
Weegy Stuff
S
1
Points 139 [Total 650]| Ratings 0| Comments 139| Invitations 0|Online
S
1
L
P
1
1
Points 137 [Total 1543]| Ratings 1| Comments 127| Invitations 0|Offline
S
P
C
L
P
L
1
P
P
1
P
1
P
Points 52 [Total 9581]| Ratings 0| Comments 52| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 31 [Total 31]| Ratings 1| Comments 21| Invitations 0|Offline
S
1
L
L
Points 24 [Total 8404]| Ratings 0| Comments 24| Invitations 0|Offline
S
R
Points 8 [Total 210]| Ratings 0| Comments 8| Invitations 0|Offline
S
L
P
P
Points 4 [Total 3563]| Ratings 0| Comments 4| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 4 [Total 4]| Ratings 0| Comments 4| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 1 [Total 1]| Ratings 0| Comments 1| Invitations 0|Offline
S
Points 1 [Total 44]| Ratings 0| Comments 1| Invitations 0|Offline
Home | Contact | Blog | About | Terms | Privacy | Social | ©2015 Purple Inc.