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A diploid cell has two pairs of homologous chromosomes. How many different combinations of chromosomes could there be in the gametes?
Weegy: Human diploid cells have 46 chromosomes and human haploid gametes (egg and sperm) have 23 chromosomes. User: Okay ? but we're talking about "How many different combinations..." (More)
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Asked 1/29/2013 12:34:06 AM
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How many different combinations of chromosomes could there be in the gametes if a diploid cell has two pairs of homologous chromosomes ?
Weegy: I will assume that you mean human cells. Somatic cells are diploid (2n), containing two sets of chromosomes, one of paternal, one of maternal origin. Gametes, on the other hand, are haploid (n), with a single set of chromosomes, ie. [ half as many as the somatic cell. Now, the haploid chromosome number (n) is characteristic of the species, and in humans this number happens to be 23. Therefore a human gamete has 23 chromosomes, and a human somatic cell 23 pairs, or 46 chromosomes. ] User: A diploid cell has two pairs of homologous chromosomes. How many different combinations of chromosomes could there be in the gametes? (More)
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Asked 1/29/2013 12:47:59 AM
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What would happen to the possible variation in gametes if the number of chromosome pairs increased from two to three? What if the number increased again from three to four?
Weegy: The mechanisms that lead to genetic variations in gametes are segregation and independent assortment of chromosomes, crossover of homologues and gene recombination, and random fertilization. [ Segregation implies that the members of the allele pair determining each trait are distributed to different gametes during meiosis. Independent assortment of chromosomes means that alleles for the same trait are distributed independently of each other. The net result is that each gamete has a single allele for each trait, but that allele represents only one of the four possible parent alleles. Crossover of homologues and gene recombination implies that two of the four chromatids in a tetrad take part in crossing over and recombination, but these two may make many crossovers during synapsis. Paternal chromosomes can precisely exchange gene segments with the homologous maternal ones, giving rise to recombinant chromosomes with mixed contributions from each parent. Random fertilization implies that a single human egg will be fertilized by a single sperm on a totally haphazard basis. ] (More)
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Asked 1/29/2013 12:49:40 AM
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How can independent assortment help explain genetic diversity in humans? Hint: How many pairs of chromosomes are in a human diploid cell?
Weegy: Genetic diversity, the level of biodiversity, refers to the total number of genetic characteristics in the genetic makeup of a species. [ It is distinguished from genetic variability, which describes the tendency of genetic characteristics to vary. [ Genetic diversity serves as a way for populations to adapt to changing environments. With more variation, it is more likely that some individuals in a population will possess variations of alleles that are suited for the environment. Those individuals are more likely to survive to produce offspring bearing that allele. The population will continue for more generations because of the success of these individuals.[1] The academic field of population genetics includes several hypotheses and theories regarding genetic diversity. The neutral theory of evolution proposes that diversity is the result of the accumulation of neutral substitutions. Diversifying selection is the hypothesis that two subpopulations of a species live in different environments that select for different alleles at a particular locus. This may occur, for instance, if a species has a large range relative to the mobility of individuals within it. Frequency-dependent selection is the hypothesis that as alleles become more common, they become more vulnerable. This is often invoked in host-pathogen interactions, where a high frequency of a defensive allele among the host means that it is more likely that a pathogen will spread if it is able to overcome that allele. human, besides defected ones, has a total of 46 chrosomes haploid(23) + haploid(23)=Diploid(46). Hope this helped for more information about this subject I would suggest going to a website that deals with Biology and human cells I would look up somatic cells(normal cells). ] (More)
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Asked 1/29/2013 12:59:47 AM
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