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Describe one example of inductive reasoning and one example of deductive reasoning. For each example, you should explain the context and the conclusion that you drew.
Weegy: A deductive argument is an argument in which it is thought that the premises provide a guarantee of the truth of the conclusion. [ In a deductive argument, the premises are intended to provide support for the conclusion that is so strong that, if the premises are true, it would be impossible for the conclusion to be false. An inductive argument is an argument in which it is thought that the premises provide reasons supporting the probable truth of the conclusion. In an inductive argument, the premises are intended only to be so strong that, if they are true, then it is unlikely that the conclusion is false. The difference between the two comes from the sort of relation the author or expositor of the argument takes there to be between the premises and the conclusion. If the author of the argument believes that the truth of the premises definitely establishes the truth of the conclusion due to definition, logical entailment or mathematical necessity, then the argument is deductive. If the author of the argument does not think that the truth of the premises definitely establishes the truth of the conclusion, but nonetheless believes that their truth provides good reason to believe the conclusion true, then the argument is inductive. The noun “deduction” refers to the process of advancing a deductive argument, or going through a process of reasoning that can be reconstructed as a deductive argument. “Induction” refers to the process of advancing an inductive argument, or making use of reasoning that can be reconstructed as an inductive argument. Because deductive arguments are those in which the truth of the conclusion is thought to be completely guaranteed and not just made probable by the truth of the premises, if the argument is a sound one, the truth of the conclusion is “contained within” the truth of the premises; i.e., the conclusion does not go beyond what the truth of the premises implicitly requires. For this reason, deductive arguments are ... (More)
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Asked 1/18/2012 7:08:01 PM
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Describe one example of inductive reasoning and one example of deductive reasoning. For each example, you should explain the context and the conclusion that you drew.
Weegy: Deductive reasoning is one of the two basic forms of valid reasoning. It begins with a general hypothesis or known fact and creates a specific conclusion from that generalization. [ This is the opposite of inductive reasoning, which involves creating broad generalizations from specific observations. The basic idea of deductive reasoning is that if something is true of a class of things in general, this truth applies to all members of that class. One of the keys for sound deductive reasoning, then, is to be able to properly identify members of the class, because incorrect categorizations will result in unsound conclusions. Truth and Validity For deductive reasoning to be sound, the original hypothesis or generalization also must be correct. A logical deduction can be made from any generalization, even if it is not true. If the generalization is wrong, though, the specific conclusion can be logical and valid but still can be incorrect. Examples One can better understand deductive reasoning by looking at examples. A generalization might be something such as, "All wasps have stingers." The logical conclusion of a specific instance would then be, "That is a wasp, so it has a stinger." This is a valid deduction. The truth of the deduction, however, depends on whether the observed insect is, indeed, a wasp.People often use deductive reasoning without even knowing it. For example, a parent might say to a child, "Be careful of that wasp — it might sting you." The parent says this because he or she knows that wasps have stingers and, therefore, that the observed wasp has a stinger and might sting the child. Inductive Reasoning Inductive reasoning would work in the opposite order. The specific observation would be that a particular wasp has a stinger. One could then induce that all wasps have stingers. Many scientific tests involve proving whether a deduction or induction is, in fact, true. Inducing that all cats have orange fur because one cat has orange fur, ... (More)
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Asked 1/18/2012 7:15:06 PM
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Describe one example of inductive reasoning and one example of deductive reasoning. For each example, you should explain the context and the conclusion that you drew.
Weegy: Inductive and deductive reasoning are both approaches which can be used to evaluate information. [ They are used on a daily basis by people all over the world for tasks which range from perfecting a cookie recipe to developing new theories in the sciences. Each approach is very different, and it is important to be aware that both inductive and deductive reasoning can end up with false results, especially if the initial premise of the reasoning is false, in which case the results are said to be “unsound.” Put simply, deductive reasoning involves moving from generalities to specifics by working through a series of reasoned statements. Inductive reasoning, on the other hand, takes a series of specific observations and tries to expand them into a more general theory. A simplistic example of inductive reasoning might start with an observation such as “all of the cows I have ever seen are spotted.” One might, in turn, say that therefore all cows must be spotted. This is not actually the case, but given the available information, one might be forgiven for thinking it. The next step in this logic might involve attempting to find things which disprove the assertion that all cows are spotted, as might be done by asking other people if they have seen cows which are not spotted. Inductive reasoning is commonly seen in the sciences when people want to make sense of a series of observation. Isaac Newton, for example, famously used inductive reasoning to develop a theory of gravity. Using observations, people can develop a theory to explain those observations, and seek out disproof of that theory. As can be seen in the cow example above, one of the major flaws with inductive reasoning is that it is dependent on observations, and when observations are incomplete, unsound results may be formulated. In a famous example of inductive reasoning, some people in the ancient world believed that meat spontaneously gave rise to maggots. Their conclusion was based on the ... (More)
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Asked 1/18/2012 7:21:37 PM
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how listening skills can help you (or others). How do these skills help in the professional and academic setting
Weegy: Why You Need Good Listening Skills Good listening skills make workers more productive. [ The ability to listen carefully will allow you to: •better understand assignments and what is expected of you; •build rapport with co-workers, bosses, and clients; •show support; •work better in a team-based environment; •resolve problems with customers, co-workers, and bosses; •answer questions; and •find underlying meanings in what others say. ] (More)
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Updated 1/19/2012 9:53:20 PM
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Why You Need Good Listening Skills
Good listening skills make workers more productive. The ability to listen carefully will allow you to:


•better understand assignments and what is expected of you;

•build rapport with co-workers, bosses, and clients;

•show support;

•work better in a team-based environment;

•resolve problems with customers, co-workers, and bosses;

•answer questions; and

•find underlying meanings in what others say.
Added 1/19/2012 9:53:20 PM
Write 1 simple or compound sentences for each of the following formulas: SV: SSV: SVV: SSVV: I; I: I; I: I; I: I; I: I, c I: I, c I: I, c I: I, c I:
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Updated 1/20/2012 6:06:13 PM
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SV - one subject, one verb My brother ran down the busy street. (brother = subject / ran = verb)

SSV - compound subjects, one verb Dad and I trampled each other as we tried to untangle the lights.
(Dad, I = subjects / trampled = verb)

SVV - one subject, compound verbs Bobby stuffed some turkey into his mouth and grabbed a fist full of cranberry sauce.
(Bobby = subject / stuffed, grabbed = verbs)

SSVV - compound subjects, compound verbs Fluffy and Fido chased each other around the tree and finally knocked it over with a loud crash.
(Fluffy, Fido = subjects / chased, knocked = verbs)

I hope this is helpful for you.
Added 1/20/2012 6:06:13 PM
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